Let's Talk: 1-877-479-4385

Posts Tagged social networking

Learning Can Be Spontaneous and Unexpected

Learning Can Be Spontaneous and Unexpected

Spontaneous learning recently occurred for one of my resident assistants when she had to deal with a tough situation.  When everyone was freaking out, she remained calmed and handled the situation by calling who she needed to call to get the individuals the help they needed.  While she had been previously trained through mock situations on how different events should be handle, this was her first time handling a real-life situation. After the situation the resident assistant and I had a conversation about how she felt it went and she said that she never would have thought she knew that much.  She said she knew she had learned a lot during the resident assistant training but never would have guessed that she would have been able to implement her learning so well. She unexpectedly learned that she could handled a real life […]

Read More...

New Red Rover Feature: Get Your Follow On

Earlier this month, Tom wrote about the difference between communities based on weak ties and those built on stronger, face-to-face interactions. The strong-tie groups have a longevity that comes from the real-world relationships between members, while groups that are based on weak ties can form easily, but dissolve just as quickly if the members don’t maintain and deepen their connections. Web 2.0 platforms provide massive opportunities for weak, transient connections, and that’s part of what makes today’s social media so attractive—it provides opportunities for microinteractions, like Facebook wall posts, blog comments, and Twitter @ replies, which are easy, low-pressure ways to feel like a part of a group. Red Rover transforms those casual microinteractions into meaningful, long-lasting community engagement. Weak-tie relationships that begin with a comment or a follow can develop into real friendships, mentorships, and communities, which form around […]

Read More...

Beyond the Classroom: An Interview with Nic Ford

Nic Ford is a sophomore at Lewis-Clark State College in Idaho, and is a member of the Red Rover Ground Team. He’s working toward a career in Marketing, and has big plans for his campus radio station this fall. Check out Nic’s design work at Nicography.net. Nic spoke with us about using tools like the Red Rover Student Directory to take his education beyond the classroom: On social media: Like many, I started using MySpace way back before Facebook was huge. I remember having a Facebook, but not being able to remember the password because I hardly ever used it. Today, I even have Facebook on my HTC. Incredible. I do have a Twitter account and a blog. I’m not overly clever, so most of my Twitter use is for following some pretty funny people. On using the Red Rover […]

Read More...

Guiding Principles – Part 1

Our Wikispace reminds me of my over stuffed parents’ attic. Among all the “once cool/relavant but now outdated” stuff are gems that got lost in the noise. In the process of updating a few Wiki pages, I stumbled upon our “Guiding Principles” page and, in rereading, realized it’s well worth exposing to the light once again. Due to the size, I’ll post in three parts so your scrolling finger doesn’t get jammed. Software Principles: Simple. Simple gets used. Students are the primary customers. Schools are secondary. Student desires come before school desires (right up to the simple line). If students don’t use it, the rest is moot. Open standards. Users should be free to roam with their data. APIs instead of build in house. Work in the open. Network = learning and adoption. Adoption trumps secrets. (And secrets aren’t as […]

Read More...

The Value of Integrating Social Media into Education

Dean Long, of LAUS, only needs two minutes to perfectly explain how every educator should be thinking about social media. And if your life is too busy for a two minute interlude, here are the highlights: Use SM (Social Media) to cultivate a community around the activities already being done on campus Support student bloggers Let students be the producers of the school’s content Give students the capacity to think and reflect around their experiences Schools benefit by showcasing what they do to a larger audience Using SM will cultivate a larger community Reflective learning is nothing new, the new challenge is translating the goal into a digital era  

Read More...

Your New Best Friend, Social Networking in the First Year Experience (Part 3)

A values debate that might lead to learning, about what is useful or appropriate, gets confused with simple fight about control of technology. High schools ban cell phones. Higher education fumes about behaviors it sees as unwarranted risk, unjustified by student benefits that are often dismissed as “not real”. Overvaluing control, prevents the institution from recognizing other possible institutional values, like connection and mentoring, in the new technology.

Read More...

Facebook and The Adolescent Brain – The Emerging Employers’ Dilemma

Facebook and The Adolescent Brain – The Emerging Employers’ Dilemma

Two weeks ago, I asked my Facebook followers if they’d post differently knowing that 60% of employers search the web when considering potential employees. Several students came back with strongly worded annoyances about not wanting to change their online behavior: Then my adult friends chimed in: Though we were talking about online behavior, the difference in opinion between students and adults highlights that adolescent behavior online is no different than adolescent behavior offline. And the gap between adult cognitive processing and adolescent cognitive processing is still tangible. The cognitive processing gap reminded me of the September 2008 Time Magazine cover story that took an in-depth look at the adolescent brain, led by Dr. Jay Giedd of the National Institute of Mental Health. The goal of the study was to: … determine how the brain develops from childhood into adolescence and […]

Read More...

Orientation Before Orientation: The New Work of First Year Social Network Development

We exist in overlapping, intertwined social networks: family, friends, neighbors, church groups, hobby acquaintances, christmas card friends, etc. etc. It’s an old human thing, we’ve always been that way. We get emotional well being from the close family and friends. We get growth from topic groups. We need well being first, then growth, it’s Maslow’s hierarchy. When a college adopts a new, incoming student, the student’s networks are paramount. The student goes through the official stages:   Contact -> Admissions -> Orientation -> Classs (First Year Experience) -> Advising   Through this college entrance process, students will be negotiating a dramatic shift in their networks. The process can be tricky. When I did it, I felt dislocated and uprooted. It’s often different now. Schools, through various methods, have always tried to help. Student ambassadors, shared interest residence halls, learning communities, […]

Read More...

Is Facebook Making My Brain Bigger?

Is Facebook Making My Brain Bigger?

We mammals have a unique part of our brain called the neocortex that separates us from every other animal on the planet. Among mammals, neocortex sizes vary greatly and humans having the largest neocortex. The research is still not yet definitive as to why humans are the largest. The most popular theory, created by biologist Robin Dunbar, says that the size of the neocortex “correlates with the number of social variables such as group size and the complexity of social mating behaviors.” In his New York Times bestselling book, The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell dedicates a chapter to the magic number 150. Through his citations he shows that the number 150 shows up over and over again throughout history as the maximum size for positively functioning social groups. Groups larger than 150 have a decreasing level of intimacy, interdependency, and […]

Read More...

Assuming: You and Me, and Hopefully Good (Opposed to . . . ) Software

When reading a review of the new iMovie ’08 on macworld.com, I was struck by how much hope, belief, educated guessing, and philosophy hardens into assumptions to inform software design. In the review, Macworld says that many of the iDVD integration features have been dropped from iMovie, because Apple believes that the web is the way video will be distributed. Apple believes the DVD is dying and will soon enough be dead. They also believe that one should be able to create a movie in under 5 minutes. These simple ideas, along with all the other myriad beliefs and assumptions of Apple, get mapped on to the software and result in an entirely new piece of software.  They literally threw the old one out, because they changed a few key ideas. It got me thinking about our beliefs and assumptions […]

Read More...
12