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Posts Tagged digital identity

Are Linkedin Recommendations for Student Leaders the New Thing?

Are Linkedin Recommendations for Student Leaders the New Thing?

The first time I asked an advisor of mine to write me a letter of recommendation back in college he said, “sure, fill out what you want me to say and I’ll adjust as needed and sign.” At the time I thought that was cheating, but once I realized that he also got asked from 30 other student leaders, I thought it was pretty smart. Now that I’m on the other side, I often find myself saying, “sure, fill out what you want me to say and I’ll adjust as needed and sign.” The other day, however, I had a student leader ask me for a letter of recommendation via Linkedin. This was a first for me. I’d filled out Linkedin recommendations for work colleagues and consultants, but never for a student leader’s work. The more I thought about it, […]

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The Emerging Dilemma of Facebook URLs

The Emerging Dilemma of Facebook URLs

While hanging out with friends, someone asked the group what our first online screen name was. We all shared and laughed as each one was more obnoxious than the previous. BigBlueEyez22 LookAtMe_LookAtMe Itz*MEEEEEEEEEE TheKooliest sportygirl9 footballdemon i<3puppies CrappyMcCrapper Luckily we’ve all grown up and realized that those names, while fun and cool when we were in Junior High, are a bad reflection of our professional aspirations. So most of us now use either our real name, or something very close. A couple years ago, I wrote about a Time Magazine article that showed how the adolescent brain develops from childhood into early adulthood. In short, the research in the article showed that the part of the brain that is responsible for making smart decisions based on long term thinking, is the last part of the brain to develop around the […]

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Why You Should Use Your Real Name Online

Over the past week we experimented with a new series called “Yesterday in #StudentAffairs” as a way to capture, and re-purpose, the amazing amount of knowledge that flows through #SAchat every day. We originally used a person’s Twitter username to give them credit, which worked fine when their real name and Twitter username were basically the same thing. But when the person’s Twitter name was something totally different like @sunnysuzysunday or @ramblingmythoughts, it felt odd using it as a citation on the post because it didn’t feel like a credible source. So we switched to using everyone’s real name that is attached to their Twitter account and then hyperlinking back to their Twitter account. It reminds me of my first email address back in highschool where I picked something that I thought was fun and creative, but then as I […]

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Social Media and Student Activism: An Interview with Dan McDowell

Dan McDowell is a junior at the University of Massachusetts-Boston, studying Political Science with a minor in Public Policy. He’s currently the Speaker of the Student Senate in the Undergraduate Student Government, contributes to the SGA Collaborative, and moderates the #SGAChat on Twitter. He took a break from his busy schedule to talk with us about using social media to engage his campus with student government. How useful have web tools like blogging or Twitter been in achieving your goals, both in Student Government and personally? Our student government is just starting to dip into the realm of social media and working to build a stronger presence. We launched a new website at the very beginning of this year that includes a blog and a transparency tracker for legislative votes, as well as a variety of pages to aid those seeking […]

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Newsletter: November 2010

Newsletter: November 2010

As the month of November wound down to a close, we found ourselves reflecting on the things for which we are thankful. In a world of increasing digital noise, we are most grateful for the meaningful relationships and serendipitous discoveries that new technologies can bring. Stay tuned—in the next few months, we’ll be unveiling new ways that the *|MMERGE3|* Directory can help build and strengthen those connections. When NMSU graduate student Anton Magallanez told students at Fall Orientation about the new NMSU Directory, he later blogged, “Their replies: ‘Sick!’ and ‘Oh nice, that makes sense!’” Now, Anton is teaching two undergrad classes, and he’s using the Red Rover First Year Experience Curriculum to educate his students about online identity. After all, helping students develop positive digital identities sets them up for success in an increasingly digital age. To follow his progress, check […]

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The First Year Experience Curriculum

The First Year Experience Curriculum

Although the vast majority of first-year students are using Facebook and Myspace, and spending a great deal of time on the web, many still aren’t familiar with the web tools that are most conducive to enhancing their education. Helping students develop positive digital identities sets them up for success in an increasingly digital age – after all, Google is the new resume. Our First Year Experience Curriculum is a web technology curriculum plug-in for instructors. Use it “as is,” or scale it up/down to fit into your FYE seminar. We’ve split the curriculum up into three themes: 1) Digital Identity, 2) Networking, and 3) Contributing. Within each theme, there’s a lesson plan component that can either stand alone as the lesson plan for any given seminar meeting, or as part of a larger lesson plan. In some cases, there is more than […]

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The Value of Integrating Social Media into Education

Dean Long, of LAUS, only needs two minutes to perfectly explain how every educator should be thinking about social media. And if your life is too busy for a two minute interlude, here are the highlights: Use SM (Social Media) to cultivate a community around the activities already being done on campus Support student bloggers Let students be the producers of the school’s content Give students the capacity to think and reflect around their experiences Schools benefit by showcasing what they do to a larger audience Using SM will cultivate a larger community Reflective learning is nothing new, the new challenge is translating the goal into a digital era  

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Facebook and The Adolescent Brain – The Emerging Employers’ Dilemma

Facebook and The Adolescent Brain – The Emerging Employers’ Dilemma

Two weeks ago, I asked my Facebook followers if they’d post differently knowing that 60% of employers search the web when considering potential employees. Several students came back with strongly worded annoyances about not wanting to change their online behavior: Then my adult friends chimed in: Though we were talking about online behavior, the difference in opinion between students and adults highlights that adolescent behavior online is no different than adolescent behavior offline. And the gap between adult cognitive processing and adolescent cognitive processing is still tangible. The cognitive processing gap reminded me of the September 2008 Time Magazine cover story that took an in-depth look at the adolescent brain, led by Dr. Jay Giedd of the National Institute of Mental Health. The goal of the study was to: … determine how the brain develops from childhood into adolescence and […]

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Orientation Before Orientation: The New Work of First Year Social Network Development

We exist in overlapping, intertwined social networks: family, friends, neighbors, church groups, hobby acquaintances, christmas card friends, etc. etc. It’s an old human thing, we’ve always been that way. We get emotional well being from the close family and friends. We get growth from topic groups. We need well being first, then growth, it’s Maslow’s hierarchy. When a college adopts a new, incoming student, the student’s networks are paramount. The student goes through the official stages:   Contact -> Admissions -> Orientation -> Classs (First Year Experience) -> Advising   Through this college entrance process, students will be negotiating a dramatic shift in their networks. The process can be tricky. When I did it, I felt dislocated and uprooted. It’s often different now. Schools, through various methods, have always tried to help. Student ambassadors, shared interest residence halls, learning communities, […]

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Blogs as E-portfolios: Better for the Students, Cheaper for the .edu

Please don’t pay for e-portfolio software. Instead, help or encourage the students to set up their own blogs. Let me quickly explain. The original idea of an e-portfolio was to help students keep a record of the work they did. This was intended to help them learn and show progress (the faculty and institution value) and get a job (the student’s value). While there is some tension between the faculty and the students with their respective values, both are good simple goals. Companies were set up to build technology to facilitate this collection and distribution of information, but times changed and new methods have become clear, easier, more effective, and cheaper. Blogs are a much better way to go. A simple rule of thumb: it’s not an e-portfolio if Google can’t find it. The Benefits of Blogs: Students learn best […]

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